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Review of DLink DNS-323

DLink DNS-323

Looking for a NAS solution that’s reliable, quiet and offers RAID features at an affordable price? Look no further than the DLink DNS-323!

Ever since I had a hard drive failure last year that stood to cost me a lot of money in code I had written, I have been on the lookout for a dependable and affordable network storage solution that would sit nicely in my study. I had heard a lot of good things about the DLink DNS-323 from reliable sources and since Komplett had one on special offer last week (-22%), I decided to take the plunge.

The unit can take up to 2TB in storage; either 2*1TB in RAID1 or RAID0 or JBOD, whatever your preference is. Personally, my requirement was RAID0 and I decided to kit out the unit with 2*500B Seagate Barracudas with 32MB buffers. This configuration will hopefully offer me stability, reliability and also equally important, quietness. I went for the Seagate drives above the nearest price competitor (Samsung) because the Barracudas rated at 0.2 bels less in terms of operating noise and any noise reduction when your working beside a disk array is welcomed. However, in fairness to the 323, it is a very quiet system and when happily spinning away it doesn’t make much noise at all, certainly less noise than many desktop PCs.

Other features on the device include an iTunes server (DAAPD distribution), an FTP server, an AV media streaming server and a host of configuration options to keep most people happy. There is also a massive online community supporting this device and providing information on mods and hacks that significantly enhance the features of the unit. They even have their own Wiki site that is regularly updated. If I had to find issue with the unit then it would be that the DAAPD iTunes server doesn’t have a web interface that allows you to create playlists so you’re stuck with the basics. Unless that is of course, you enable telnet on the device like I did and copy across your own DAAPD playlist file to the /etc directory. Beware though that this playlist is overwritten each time the system reboots so you may want to look into some fun plug scripts to help you out there. Overall this is an excellent device and one that I am very happy that I have purchased. My set-up cost just under Eur 400 but anyone that has ever suffered drive failure will know that this is a small price to pay for securely and reliably backing up data. Buy one now!

Rated 5/5 on Feb 11 2008
Vote on Jonathan Brazil‘s Reviews at LouderVoice
Review Tags: 323, backup, disk, dlink, dns-323, drive, itunes, jbod, mirror, nas, network, raid0, raid1, server, storage

2 thoughts on “Review of DLink DNS-323”

  1. Have you plugged it into a wireless router yet? I’m looking for a wireless storage system for home and am pretty darned confused right now. The AirPort Extreme Base Station (with AirDisk) sounds good but I’m reading of some problems with it.

  2. Hi Paul,

    Yeah, the D-Link is sitting happy connected to a switch and plugged into my router. No problems accessing it from Mac or Windows – haven’t tried it as a Time Machine disk yet but I would assume that there is no problems. Overall I couldn’t fault the device apart from the fact that my PS3 can’t see the media on it but that’s not the D-Link’s fault, it’s the PS3’s for not supporting the standard DAAP protocol. However, the iTunes server does work very nicely and all my music is now safely mirrored and accessible from any iTunes client in the house. The admin interface supports lots of nice stuff and if you’re interested in going beyond the manual then there’s a huge community out there that like to tweak the device using “fun plug” scripts to execute extra services on startup. I’ve only been messing around with Telnet access and getting Twonky media server up and running but I believe that you can do much, much more if you have the time – it’s very easy too. Big thumbs up!

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